Kathleen and Michael Gear

An anthropological exploration of the human condition, past, present, and fictional.

ancientart:

These discs are from the collection of offerings found in El Castillo at Chichen Itza, Yucatán, Mexico. Chichen Itza, pictured in the second photo, is a city built by the Maya people, and was one of the greatest Maya centres on the Yucatán peninsula.
The disks shown are courtesy of & currently located the National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico. This photo was taken by Kim F, the second is by Tony Hisgett.

These discs are gorgeous works of art, in our opinions, especially the turquoise inlaid disc.  Just lovely.
ZoomInfo
ancientart:

These discs are from the collection of offerings found in El Castillo at Chichen Itza, Yucatán, Mexico. Chichen Itza, pictured in the second photo, is a city built by the Maya people, and was one of the greatest Maya centres on the Yucatán peninsula.
The disks shown are courtesy of & currently located the National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico. This photo was taken by Kim F, the second is by Tony Hisgett.

These discs are gorgeous works of art, in our opinions, especially the turquoise inlaid disc.  Just lovely.
ZoomInfo

ancientart:

These discs are from the collection of offerings found in El Castillo at Chichen Itza, Yucatán, Mexico. Chichen Itza, pictured in the second photo, is a city built by the Maya people, and was one of the greatest Maya centres on the Yucatán peninsula.

The disks shown are courtesy of & currently located the National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico. This photo was taken by Kim F, the second is by Tony Hisgett.

These discs are gorgeous works of art, in our opinions, especially the turquoise inlaid disc.  Just lovely.

(via spaceadmiraldee)

http://sfglobe.com/?id=14064&src=share_fb_new_14064

TO GET A BALANCED PERSPECTIVE ABOUT WOLVES IN YELLOWSTONE…

Please read:

 http://rmefblog.blogspot.com/2013/03/yellowstone-elk-population-falls.html

Then watch:

http://sfglobe.com/?id=14064&src=share_fb_new_14064

What you’re seeing is the Law of Unintended Consequences.  When humans decide to ”bring back” species, we upset the entire ecosystem, and it has good and bad consequences, depending entirely upon the species you choose to look at.

Here’s another great video—which we participated in.  Many of the buffalo you see are on Red Canyon Ranch in Wyoming— http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/wild/episodes/thunderbeast/

You see, the truth is that the elk and moose populations have dropped dramatically in Yellowstone.  Not just through wolf kills, but the increase in forests reduces the grazing land available for foraging by deer, elk, and bison.  When you see videos like this, try to remember that every action has an equal and opposite reaction.  No one side represents the whole truth.

medievalistsnet:

The real story about how Christianity came to Britain! ~S

The Prevalence of Christianity in Roman Britain to AD 410

Janka Dowding

Hirundo: The McGill Journal of Classical Studies, Volume III: 53-63 (2004)

Abstract

Popular mythology claims that Joseph of Arimathea introduced Christianity into Britain in AD 63 when he brought the Holy Grail to Glastonbury after Christ’s crucifixion. As this story demonstrates, a befuddling mix of myth, tradition and fact dominates the period preceding the Roman withdrawal. The literary evidence comes primarily from later sources like Bede and Gildas, who depend on older sources that have since been lost. In these texts it is often difficult to differentiate fact from fiction, as well as to establish with any certainty the depth to which Christianity had infiltrated the island. When the Romans withdrew from Britain in the early fifth century, they not only left behind a vast Roman culture, but also a religion, Christianity, which was inherently Roman…

Excellent article on the spread of Christianity and how it came to be…

(via pagansquare)

danieljungphoto:

“I have traveled through the tomb, dark and lonely ground. I am here now. I have come. I see. In the underworld, I embraced my father. I have burned away his darkness. I am his beloved. I have killed the snake. I have given him meat. I walk in my sleep through earth and heaven.”
- The Chapters of Coming Forth by Day (Egyptian Book of the Dead)
It is not uncommon to find carvings of baboons on Egyptian temples or tombs. In Chapter 155 of the Book of the Dead, four baboons were described as sitting as the corners of a pool of fire in the Afterlife. I photographed this carving in the Temple of Hathor and it is unusual because the baboon has a face more like a fish and is holding 2 cleavers.
© Daniel Jung  danieljungphoto.com

Combination figures like this are found in many cultures around the world.  Combining elements from different creatures was often a way of uniting worlds: the worlds of fish and baboon, in this case.  Maybe earth and water.  Wonder if the baboon needs to see through the eyes of the fish—through water—to cleave the darkness?  What we would give to go back in time for just a day or two…
ZoomInfo
Camera

Canon EOS 5D Mark III

ISO

6400

Aperture

f/4

Exposure

1/125th

Focal Length

24mm

danieljungphoto:

I have traveled through the tomb, dark and lonely ground. I am here now. I have come. I see. In the underworld, I embraced my father. I have burned away his darkness. I am his beloved. I have killed the snake. I have given him meat. I walk in my sleep through earth and heaven.”

- The Chapters of Coming Forth by Day (Egyptian Book of the Dead)

It is not uncommon to find carvings of baboons on Egyptian temples or tombs. In Chapter 155 of the Book of the Dead, four baboons were described as sitting as the corners of a pool of fire in the Afterlife. I photographed this carving in the Temple of Hathor and it is unusual because the baboon has a face more like a fish and is holding 2 cleavers.

© Daniel Jung  danieljungphoto.com

Combination figures like this are found in many cultures around the world.  Combining elements from different creatures was often a way of uniting worlds: the worlds of fish and baboon, in this case.  Maybe earth and water.  Wonder if the baboon needs to see through the eyes of the fish—through water—to cleave the darkness?  What we would give to go back in time for just a day or two…

(via coriniumcernunnosii)

      Western Wall plaza dig reveals ‘most impressive’ building

archaeologicalnews:

image

Israeli archaeologists recently dug up an ancient subterranean structure, parts of which date back to Roman times, just meters from the Temple Mount, Channel 10 reported Sunday.

“It’s one of the [most] impressive, beautiful and grand places found recently in Jerusalem,” Israel Antiquities…

There is so much history left to be found in the world.  This is a great example of what awaits future archaeologists…

"We are living in a culture entirely hypnotized by the illusion of time, in which the so-called present moment is felt as nothing but an infinitesimal hairline between an all-powerfully causative past and an absorbingly important future. We have no present. Our consciousness is almost completely preoccupied with memory and expectation. We do not realize that there never was, is, nor will be any other experience than present experience.
We are therefore out of touch with reality. We confuse the world as talked about, described, and measured with the world which actually is. We are sick with a fascination for the useful tools of names and numbers, of symbols, signs, conceptions and ideas."

Alan Watts (via panatmansam)

Watts had a marvelous way of translating the ethereal concepts of Buddhism to make them understandable.  “We are sick with a fascination for useful tools…”  Are we?  Do human beings spend so much of their time focusing on tools and the splendid things they can do that we forget there is a quiet world outside?  …Well, are you reading this?  

(via buffleheadcabin)

kateoplis:

Today in Japan: 31 climbers who wanted to see the first signs of autumn on top of Mount Ontake, a 10,062-foot volcano, have been found dead after the mountain erupted unexpectedly yesterday.

Such a tragedy.  Volcanos are, beyond a doubt, one of the most dangerous of natural phenomena.  A couple of years ago, we were cruising by the small volcano of Stromboli in the Greek Isles and found ourselves staring wide-eyed at the houses built on the side of the volcano—all empty, thank goodness.  Because humans spend most of their time living inside their heads, we too often forget the outside world doesn’t care about any of that.
ZoomInfo
kateoplis:

Today in Japan: 31 climbers who wanted to see the first signs of autumn on top of Mount Ontake, a 10,062-foot volcano, have been found dead after the mountain erupted unexpectedly yesterday.

Such a tragedy.  Volcanos are, beyond a doubt, one of the most dangerous of natural phenomena.  A couple of years ago, we were cruising by the small volcano of Stromboli in the Greek Isles and found ourselves staring wide-eyed at the houses built on the side of the volcano—all empty, thank goodness.  Because humans spend most of their time living inside their heads, we too often forget the outside world doesn’t care about any of that.
ZoomInfo
kateoplis:

Today in Japan: 31 climbers who wanted to see the first signs of autumn on top of Mount Ontake, a 10,062-foot volcano, have been found dead after the mountain erupted unexpectedly yesterday.

Such a tragedy.  Volcanos are, beyond a doubt, one of the most dangerous of natural phenomena.  A couple of years ago, we were cruising by the small volcano of Stromboli in the Greek Isles and found ourselves staring wide-eyed at the houses built on the side of the volcano—all empty, thank goodness.  Because humans spend most of their time living inside their heads, we too often forget the outside world doesn’t care about any of that.
ZoomInfo

kateoplis:

Today in Japan: 31 climbers who wanted to see the first signs of autumn on top of Mount Ontake, a 10,062-foot volcano, have been found dead after the mountain erupted unexpectedly yesterday.

Such a tragedy.  Volcanos are, beyond a doubt, one of the most dangerous of natural phenomena.  A couple of years ago, we were cruising by the small volcano of Stromboli in the Greek Isles and found ourselves staring wide-eyed at the houses built on the side of the volcano—all empty, thank goodness.  Because humans spend most of their time living inside their heads, we too often forget the outside world doesn’t care about any of that.

(via anthrogirlet)

laboratoryequipment:

Neanderthals, Humans had ‘Ample Time’ to Mix

Humans and Neanderthals may have coexisted in Europe for more than 5,000 years, providing ample time for the two species to meet and mix, according to new research.

Using new carbon dating techniques and mathematical models, researchers examined about 200 samples found at 40 sites from Spain to Russia, according to a study published in the journal Nature. They concluded with a high probability that pockets of Neanderthal culture survived until between 41,030 and 39,260 years ago.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/neanderthals-humans-had-ample-time-mix


Yes, no doubt about it, Neandertals and modern humans knew each other and spent time dropping their jeans…er, genes. The average person has 2-3% Neandertal genes. 

(via spaceadmiraldee)